P. Pufferfish has mixed feelings about the ending of an otherwise fantastic trilogy.

clockworkprincesscoverToday’s featured book: Clockwork Princess, by Cassandra Clare (Book #3 of The Infernal Devices trilogy)

Format I consumed it in: E-book, from the library near my house

The premise: The book opens with Tessa trying on her wedding dress, ’cause in case you forgot what happened in Clockwork Prince, she and Jem are about to get married! Of course, since they’re living in the London Institute, where all the action happens, they’re interrupted by Gabriel Lightwood running in to inform them that his father’s morphed into a giant, murderous worm. The gang immediately rushes off to help Gabriel reason with Benedict Lightwood (if still possible) or deal with him (if necessary). Without spoiling anything, the rest of the book continues in a similarly fast-paced fashion. There are countless automaton attacks, Jem’s supply of yin fen, which he is dependent upon to live, runs out unexpectedly early, Tessa finally learns the entire story behind who/what she is, Charlotte faces incredibly sexist and therefore unreasonable and frustrating challenges to her leadership from Consul Wayland, who had previously supported her, and that’s only in the first 60% of the book!

My thoughts: [Spoilers] I am inordinately pleased with this book. It was by far the best of the three Infernal Devices books, and I thought the other two were pretty good. Tessa is a damn good heroine/protagonist, and I get why Jem and Will both love her so much. I also get why she loves them and has trouble choosing between them, AND! I really see how much they love each other and am surprised they both ended up loving another person in addition to each other. I jumped ships not once, not twice, but THRICE over the course of this trilogy. At first, I shipped Will/Tessa. Then I shipped Jem/Tessa. Then I shipped Will/Jem. And finally, I decided it had to be a perfect triangular romance between the three of them. Will/Tessa/Jem. Will/Jem/Tessa. Jem/Will/Tessa. Whichever order would work. Normally, love triangles are more like love carets (this symbol: ^^^^). They meet in the middle but that last line that would make it a true triangle is non-existent. NOT SO HERE! There is even a line at the end about how half of Jem’s heart belongs to Will and the other half to Tessa, and half of Tessa’s heart belongs to Jem and the other half to Will or something like that, but I read it as Cassandra Clare canonically declaring that Will/Tessa/Jem is a thing, and YOU CANNOT CONVINCE ME OTHERWISE.

I was surprised by what happened to Jessamyne. I thought that she would be given a redemption arc, like the one that Gabriel Lightwood got, but guess not! Speaking of Gabriel, he is a treasure. Like a more awkward version of Will. He actually reminds me a lot of Alec (from The Mortal Instruments, who is his descendant). Izzy is more like Cecily, who is very, very free-spirited and independent for a girl from a proper “mundane” Victorian home; I kept remembering when Tessa first came to London and was more reserved and conservative– not so with Cecily, who is a force in and of herself. Gideon and Sophie’s romance was like romance novel fare, but so entertaining to read, and I breathed a huge sigh of relief that they both survived to the end. CHARLOTTE AND HENRY– my god, Henry gave me such a heart attack during that big battle in Cadair Idris. I thought he was a goner for sure! And Charlotte! That woman is the queen of my heart! And pretty much the queen of the Institute and later on the Clave as well. There’s an actual line comparing the male Shadowhunters of the London Institute pledging loyalty to her the way Englishmen pledged loyalty to Queen Victoria. I also liked that Bridget, the cook who sings tragic songs about love, death, and murder all day, is an insanely talented fighter and almost singlehandedly kept them all from being overwhelmed and crushed by automatons during the final battle.

I thought the book should have ended with the Christmas party, where Jessamyne’s ghost makes amends with Will and pushes him to propose to Tessa. It was unnecessary to do an extended epilogue with Tessa dealing with Will’s death, but I wouldn’t have minded the book ending in a bittersweet way like that. The Jem ending, though? What the hell? I felt like Cassandra Clare started flip-flopping and being indecisive about Jem’s fate. He doesn’t want to be a Silent Brother ’cause it would mean no more music. He decides to become a Silent Brother because he doesn’t want to die and leave Will and Tessa behind. He is a Silent Brother, but apparently he gets to ignore the rules of Silent Brotherdom and even gets to come back as his young self (albeit as a mundane) to live with Tessa decades after Will’s death? He mentions the reason for all of this having something to do with Lightwoods, Herondales, and Fairchilds, but I don’t remember anything like that happening in the first three books of The Mortal Instruments, so it must have happened in books 4-6, which I haven’t read (don’t plan to read?). I guess it’s nice that Tessa gets to not be alone for another 60 or so years, and it would support the Will/Tessa/Jem thing, but ehhhh, I wasn’t a fan.

Rating: 4.75/5.

By the way, did anyone read the preview for The Last Hours? So THIS is the Downton Abbey-esque series that everyone was talking about. I ended up reading the entire preview, and it’s not really working for me. Magnus is great. I love Magnus. But this James kid…… ehhhhhhh…… and the whole Tatiana Blackthorn-in-her-crumbling-manor-with-her-beautiful-bitchy-ward thing just reminds me too much of Great Expectations, a book that I HATED. I don’t know if I could read a whole trilogy about James-Pip pursuing Grace-Estella but with supernatural stuff thrown in (if that’s the angle Cassandra Clare’s going for). I’d rather read the three remaining Mortal Instruments books I’ve been avoiding.

P. Pufferfish loves Shadowhunters, steampunk, and Victorian England, but hates love triangles.

I’m writing book reviews out of order today because I did what everyone told me not to do and immediately started another book after finishing one yesterday. So now my head is filled with nothing but Victorian England and gray and rain and clockwork apparatuses. Guess what I was reading?

clockworkprincecover

This is most definitely NOT how I pictured Jem in my head.

Today’s featured book: Clockwork Prince, by Cassandra Clare (Book #2 of The Infernal Devices trilogy). I realize I don’t have a review of Clockwork Angel to link to; that’s because back then, I wasn’t as responsible when it came to recording/logging books I completed as I am now. Do I really need to go back and review it, though? I don’t think so– there are a GAZILLION reviews of Cassandra Clare’s books out there, 90% of them better than mine.

Format I consumed it in: E-book, from the library next to my house.

The premise: This is a sequel, so if you’re looking at it, I’m assuming you’ve already read the first book. This one picks up right where the last one left off, with Tessa and Will still being all awkward around each other ’cause he had to be all dumb and cruelly reject her right after they had their *moment* and kissed in Clockwork Angel (*whispers* but don’t worry, he has NOBLE REASONS for doing what he did!). The Shadowhunter world is still in mortal danger, though, so no time to dwell on feelings! Charlotte and Henry (the latter in name only) are at a hearing(?) to decide whether or not they (read: Charlotte) are suitable to continue running the London Institute. Sexism abounds, and that old git Benedict Lightwood offers himself up as a better choice as Institute head. Some other important people agree with him because Charlotte is young and female and supporting her is riskier and comfortably ensconced people don’t like taking risks. Also, conservatism and sexism and all that. The Consul, who is the head honcho/the man who appointed Charlotte as her father’s successor in the first place (the Head of Institute title isn’t hereditary), gives her two weeks to find/capture Mortmain and “redeem herself”.

And yes, this means the rollercoaster of feelings, confessions, meetings, comings, goings, revelations, etc., all happen in TWO WEEKS?! I’m having trouble absorbing that myself– perhaps my timeline is off? Hmm. Anyways, Tessa is still torn between her feelings for Will and her feelings for Jem, the Lightwood brothers get more screen time, a pairing that I saw coming from a mile away becomes a thing, Charlotte and Henry continue to be adorable, and Nate Gray is still a complete asshole. Oh yeah, and Tessa learns one more tiny thing about what exactly she is and how she may have come to be.

My thoughts:

On the romance: I really enjoyed this book aside from one rather large factor: THE GOD-DAMN LOVE TRIANGLE. I can’t stand triangles. They’re not so bad when they’re fleeting or more one-sided. For example, there was technically a little triangle thing going on with Tessa-Jem-Sophie, but Sophie had more of a schoolgirl crush on Jem and it was clear that Jem only cared for Tessa in that way, so it was all right. Even the Jace-Clary-Simon triangle in The Mortal Instruments was better, weird incestuous situation aside, since no one fricken believed that Clary would pick Simon in the end (they even set things up for Simon to eventually move on with other potential love interests popping up all over the place!). The triangle in Infernal Devices is more along the lines of the one from Hunger Games— all-consuming, annoying, and completely unnecessary! Just once, can’t a female YA protagonist have nothing but pure friendship with a YA male protagonist? She can get with one male protagonist in the end, but why do they BOTH have to vie for her affections? I want more close male-female friendships in YA novels! In any novels!

I suppose that in this one unique case, there is an added tragic element to the triangle because Jem’s dying and Will and Jem are closer than brothers and all that (to me, being parabatai sounds a lot like being married), but I still spent half the book groaning aloud and wondering why Cassandra Clare couldn’t have just made Jem and Tessa become drawn to each other like brother and sister, since he’s an only child and she just got betrayed by her “brother” and is all alone as well? OR! She could have completely flipped the script and made Jem and Tessa get together in the ultimate tragic way and Will and Tessa could be best friends, bonding over books! IN ANOTHER UNIVERSE…

[BIG SPOILERS] I also disliked the Jessamyne/Nate thing because I can’t imagine someone being that stupid, but hey, what do I know? Charlotte and Henry… AWWWW, just AWWWW… I shipped Sophie and Gideon as soon as they met, so I was very happy about that; the whole class lines thing was done pretty well, imo.

On the rest of the book, like the plot and all that: It was still fast-paced SOMEHOW, despite all the pauses in-between for Tessa or Will to lament about their feelings. There were seriously paragraphs/pages of nothing but pining/anguish/making out, but things still chugged along smoothly. Most of the other characters who appeared are pretty memorable, and Mortmain remains a frightening and sinister force despite not once making an appearance in this book. The clockwork automatons are also largely absent, so the focus is more on the investigation. I did have a problem with the Gideon/Benedict Lightwood thing and how it played out. I just thought the way Gideon defects is done too easily. And how the hell did Benedict throw a huge, expensive party for denizens of the Downworld without SOMEONE from his world catching wind of it? Sure, he threw it in his family’s mansion away from the city, but these are still wealthy English families living in Victorian England– word gets around. How the hell did he manage to keep everything a secret? THESE ARE THE MINOR THINGS THAT I WONDER ABOUT WHEN READING OTHERWISE GOOD STORIES.

Rating: 3.75/5. I think that if I were to give a fair, unbiased rating, it would be a 4/5, but this is MY rating, so I’m taking a whole star off for the love triangle and an additional quarter of a star for MINOR PLOT THINGS.