P. Pufferfish: On the road to becoming a John Le Carré fan?

Really quick note: I reorganized the Reviews page so that my meager number of reviews are now grouped by decade of publication. I’m hoping it’ll help me see gaps in my reading (not that I have much desire to read as many old books as new ones). Anyways, jumping right in.

murderofqualitycover

Today’s featured book: A Murder of Quality, by John Le Carré.

Format I consumed it in: Print, from the library where I work. They actually didn’t have AMoQ on its own– I had to check out the edition that came in the same volume with CFtD. 

The premise: Smiley, now retired, receives a request from an old war-time colleague, Ms. Brimley, who is working as the editor of a newspaper: a long-time reader/subscriber to the newspaper, Stella Rode, has written to tell her that she’s afraid her husband is going to kill her. Considering that their correspondence mostly consists of bland advice and recipes, this is a bit alarming. Smiley agrees to investigate, but before he can even get started, lo and behold! They receive news that Mrs. Rode has been brutally murdered! Smiley immediately heads off to Carne, the location of an expensive boarding school where Stella’s husband, Mr. Rode, teaches; coincidentally, it’s also the place where Smiley’s ex-wife, Lady Ann, grew up.

The staff of the school are stuck-up and desperately trying to hold onto the old ways, despite evidence that this isn’t working. The inhabitants of the town, including the police chief, don’t mix with the staff, but are still closed off and conservative in that small-town way. Everybody is nasty and suspicious, but nobody seems to have a really good, solid motive, which does it make it a bit tricky to figure out who the murderer is.

My thoughts: I am glad I didn’t give up on the Smiley series after the first one, because Le Carré’s writing really improves in the span of just one year/one book– the pacing is better, the big reveal is done in a much more logical/satisfying way, and although he still uses the typical giant-explanatory-paragraphs-to-show-how-a-crime-was-perpetrated method, I wasn’t bothered by it because he got his timing right. George Smiley himself is also much more likable in here.

That said, this wasn’t a particularly original or refreshing mystery novel or anything like that. It was a bit formulaic, but I’m reading it in 2017 after a shit-ton of other similar novels have been published/adapted into TV series and movies. AMoQ reads like an Agatha Christie novel, which was a bit surprising to me, because Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (the movie/my introduction to Le Carré) is completely different.

Rating: 3.5/5. I liked it, but I didn’t REALLY like it. I gave an extra star for the ending, though– it threw me off a bit and I’m still thinking about it, trying to decide if I liked it or not.

 

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